Henry Beecher Sr.
(Cir 1728-After 1795)
Catharine
(Bef 1752-After 1820)
Philip Garner Sr.
(1740-1812)
Barbara Elizabeth Winkler
(1744-1811)
Henry Beeker Sr.
(Abt 1759-1837)
Barbara Garner
(1767-1840)
John Beeker
(1785-1843)

 

Family Links

Spouses/Children:
1. Christina Young

John Beeker 1 2 3

  • Born: 11 Nov 1785, , Rowan, NC 1
  • Marriage (1): Christina Young
  • Died: 21 Aug 1843, Tippecanoe Township, Tippecanoe, IN, USA at age 57 4
  • Buried: Battle Ground: Pretty Prairie Cemetery, Tippecanoe, IN, USA 4

  Noted events in his life were:

1. Arrival: 1812, in , Washington, IN, USA. 1

2. Arrival: 1828, in Tippecanoe Township, Tippecanoe, IN, USA. 1

3. Census in 1830 in , Tippecanoe, IN. 5 The 1830 census recorded John Beeker with this household:
Home in 1830 (City, County, State): Tippecanoe, Indiana
Free White Persons - Males - Under 5: 2
Free White Persons - Males - 10 thru 14: 1
Free White Persons - Males - 15 thru 19: 1
Free White Persons - Males - 40 thru 49: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 5 thru 9: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 15 thru 19: 2
Free White Persons - Females - 40 thru 49: 1
Free White Persons - Under 20: 7
Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 2
Total Free White Persons: 9
Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored): 9

4. Book: Biographical record and portrait album of Tippecanoe County, Indiana, 1888. 1
In 1827 William Kendall and Paschal Watson settled on the Pretty Prairie, where they were joined in the following year by John Beeker and a number of others, whose names can not be ascertained. Mr. Kendall is (1887) still living on his original purchase and is, probably, the oldest settler in the township now living. Mr. Beeker died a few years subsequent to his settlement.

5. Book: Biographical record and portrait album of Tippecanoe County, Indiana: Biography of Daniel Beeker, 1888. 1
DANIEL BEEKER, a prominent and enterprising agriculturist of Tippecanoe Township, is a native of Indiana, born in Washington County, July 5, 1817, a son of John and Christina (Young) Beeker. His father was born in North Carolina in 1786 where he was reared and married. In 1812, he came to Indiana, locating in Washington County, where he resided many years, and in 1828, he came to Tippecanoe County. On coming to this county, he settled on section 12, Tippecanoe Township, where he preempted 160 acres of Government land. He was a typical pioneer, being a man of great energy and strength. Beginning life with small financial resources, by his industry and good management, he became one of the most prosperous and wealthy of the pioneers, added largely to his first purchase of land until he owned 1,100 acres of County's best soil, consisting of both prairie and timber land. In politics, he was a Democrat, and in religion, a member of the Brethren church. He died in 1841. His widow survived him a number of years, dying in 1856. They reared nine children to maturity - Barbara, widow of John Pruit, now residing in Kansas; Susannah, widow of Jacob Brown, living in Fountain County, Indiana; Leonard died in Tippecanoe Township, in 1885; Daniel, the subject of this sketch; Mary, wife of William Brown, of Fountain County; Samuel died in Tippecanoe Township, in 1875; Anna is the wife of David Brown of Benton County, Indiana, and Christina is the wife of William Laird, also living in Benton County.

6. Book: Biographical record and portrait album of Tippecanoe County, Indiana: Tippecanoe Township, 1888. 6
TIPPECANOE TOWNSHIP

The following sketch is abridged from an account written in 1878 by Wesley Mahin: Tippecanoe Township -- historically the banner township of Tippecanoe County -- presents perhaps a greater variety of soil and scenery and more points of interest to the traveler than any other township in the county. The Grand Prairie, lapping its borders on the north and west; the Pretty Prairie and the rich bottom lands of the Tippecanoe and Wabash Rivers in the east and southeast; the bluffs skirting the river on the south, and covered, or soon to be covered, with orchards and vineyards, and overlooking the beautiful valley southward with the "Star City" in the distance, and the oak uplands in the center of the township -- all conspire to form a landscape equaled by few and surpassed by none in the State.

The historical period of the township dates from the battle of Tippecanoe, a full account of which will be found in the general history of the county. The breaking-up of the Prophet's band after this battle left the adjoining country in the possession of fragments of different Indian tribes, notable among whom were the Kickapoos, Miamis and Pottawatomie. They offered no hostile annoyances to the white settlers, and, after a residence of a few years, abandoned the territory to the possession of the "pale faces."

The first white man known to have resided in the township was a Frenchman of the name of Burnett, who married a half-breed and established a trading post at Stringtown, on Burnett's Reserve, a tract of land skirting the Wabash River, just below the mouth of the Tippecanoe, extending to Burnett's Creek and including the site of the Prophet's town.

John Davis married Mr. Burnett's daughter Nancy, and established himself at what is known as "Davis Ferry" near the mouth of Burnett's Creek.

The first house in the township was probably erected at this place; it was a log structure, the ruins of which are still to be seen near the north landing of said ferry. It is not definitely known in what year this house was built -- probably about the year 1824. A few transitory settlers or "squatters" arrived soon after this date, some of whom remained for a time at or near the old Indian trading-post .The majority, however, soon removed to other localities, leaving no relics by which to trace their history.

Among the earliest permanent settlers in the township were Charles and John Moots and John Lung, the date of whose arrival is not known. In 1827 William Kendall and Paschal Watson settled on the Pretty Prairie, where they were joined in the following year by John Beeker, and a number of others, whose names can not be ascertained. Mr. Kendall is (1887) still living on his original purchase and is, probably, the oldest settler in the township now living.

Mr. Beeker died a few years subsequent to his settlement.

In the same year (1828), Daniel Corwin settled near the mouth of Moot's Creek, in the northeast part of the township, and John S. Forgey settled on section 29, town 24. William Thomas came to the township in the same year and settled finally upon lots 11 and 12, section 16, town 24, where he still resides. William Sims, the first practicing physician in the township, located on section 19, town 24, range 5. He died in 1845. In the same year (1828), John Shigley and his brother Adam ,John Shigley Jr., John Mahin and Michael Hare, with their families, settled on sections 5 and 8, town 24, range 4. They were the first settlers in the northwestern part of the township. They were soon followed by Lismond Basey ,Nathan Renfrow, John G. Smith, Basil Clevinger, Benjamin Lucas and others, whose names have passed from history. About the same time Jacob Dewy and others settled on the "Point" between the Tippecanoe and Wabash Rivers.

The settlement of the township after date was consummated very rapidly. John Shaw, Joseph Cooper, Joseph Allen, Elijah Forbes, near the Battle Ground; Samuel McCormick, John Stewart, P. O. Brown and John Goodman in the northern part the township, and J. H. Downing in southwest, were among the early settlers.

An interesting episode in the history the early settlement occurred in the 1832, at the time of what was known as Black Hawk war in Illinois. A report was circulated among the settlers and friendly Indians to the effect that Black Hawk and band were in the vicinity, and would attack and burn the settlement that night. A panic was the result; nearly all the settlers in the north and west of the township fled from their homes and rendezvoused at Davis' mill on Burnett's Creek. A few families congregated in a thicket near the present site the County Infirmary, and prepared to defend themselves to the extent of their ability. The alarm, however, was discovered to be groundless, and they returned to their homes.

The first school in the township was taught by David McConnaughey on the farm of William Kendall .The next school was taught in a log cabin in the southwest corner of section 9, town 24, range 4, by John McNara, in 1831. John S. Forgey was also one of the pioneer pedagogues of this township, having taught school in a cabin located somewhere between the battle ground and Scott & Smelser's great mill.

The first building erected exclusively for school purposes was that known as "Pleasant Grove" in the southeast corner of section 12, town 4, range 5, the remains of which are still (1887) standing. The second school house stood immediately across the stream, about 100 yards east of Liberty Chapel. At present, however, nothing remains to indicate the site of its location.

The first church in the township was known as "Old Salem." It was located near the southeast corner of section 5, town 24, range 4, on the spot where Jacob Mahin's house now stands. It was built of hewn logs, and for a number of years was a central point of worship for members of the Methodist church throughout a large portion of White and Tippecanoe Counties. Its occupation as a house of worship was discontinued in 1851.

The second church building was erected by members of the Methodist Protestant church, and like its predecessor, was built of hewn logs. It was located one-half mile east of Salem Church, and was occupied as a house of worship until 1867. The building first mentioned was erected about the year 1836, and the latter about four years later.

In 1853 the members of the Christian church erected a house of worship in the center of section 19, town 25, range 4. The latter building is a substantial brick structure and is the third church built in the township. Geneseo Methodist Episcopal Church was built in 1854; Pretty Prairie Methodist Episcopal Church in 1858; Battle Ground Methodist Episcopal Church about 1860, and Liberty Chapel Union Church in 1873. The latter is the property of the Methodist and United Brethren congregations.

7. Book: Past and Present of Tippecanoe County, Indiana, 1909. 7
Tippecanoe Township: Promominent among the pioneer settlers of Tippecanoe township were Charles and John Moots and John Lung [Young], but the date of their arrive is not known as a matter of record.
In 1827 came William Kendall and Paschal Watson, who settled on Pretty Prairie, where the following year they were joined by John Beeker and a few others.

8. Newspaper: Indianapolis Star: Indiana Ancestors column mentions Jacob Young and John Beeker, 21 Aug 1966, Indianapolis, Marion, IN. 8 Indiana Ancestors (questions mailed in):
Q-3530 Seeking burial place of Jacob YOUNG (JUNG), a Revolutionary War patriot, and wife, Magdalene. Came from Salisbury District, Rowan County, North Carolina to Harrison County in Indiana (later Washington County) about 1808. His will there dated 5-15-1816, proved 3-17-1823, named heirs: wife; sons, Jacob and Frederick (d. before (5-15-1816) daughters, Elizabeth (wife of Phillip SHOULTZ), Christina (wife of John BEKER or BEEK-ER), Magdaleen, Anna Maria. Grandchildren: Solomon and sister, Anna Maria who were children of deceased son, Frederick. Mrs. William E. Sanson, 1208 Ball Street, Lafayette, 47904.
Q-3531 In Washington County 1820 Census, John BEEKER, wife, Christina with sons Daniel and Leonard, daughters Susannah and Barbara, lived next door to Jacob YOUNG, (Senior) and wife, Magdalene. By 1830 in Tippecanoe County, John BEEKER lived next door to Elizabeth SHULTS (Z) (widow of Phillip) and next to her, John PRUITT family (wife, Barbara, sister to Elizabeth BEEKER). John BEEKER and wife are buried in Pretty Prairie Cemetery, Tippecanoe County. Will exchange. Mrs. William E. Sanson, 1208 Ball Street, Lafayette, 47904.


John married Christina Young, daughter of Jacob Young Sr. and Magdaleen Molly Burkhart. (Christina Young was born on 4 Jun 1790 in , Rowan, NC,9 10 died on 4 May 1865 in Tippecanoe Township, Tippecanoe, IN, USA 9 and was buried in Battle Ground: Pretty Prairie Cemetery, Tippecanoe, IN, USA 9.)


Sources


1 <i>Biographical record and portrait album of Tippecanoe County, Indiana</i> (Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1888. 826 pages.), Page 678. Biography of Daniel Beeker. Online https://books.google.com/books?id=2dgWAQAAMAAJ&lpg=PA678&ots=1mDjUGQ7Fr&dq=beeker%20indiana%20carolina&pg=PA678#v=onepage&q=beeker%20indiana%20carolina&f=false.

2 Ancestry.com, <i>Indiana, Death Certificates, 1899-2011</i>, Certificate 19756. Christena Beeker Laird. Father John Beecker. Mother __ Young. Spouse Geo. W. Laird. Informant Mr. Elmer Laird.

3 Richard Patten DeHart, <i>Past and Present of Tippecanoe County, Indiana: Vol 2</i> (Indianapolis, Indiana, B. F. Bowen & Coompany, Publishers. 1909. Online https://play.google.com/books/reader?id=blA0AQAAMAAJ at Google Books), page 1163-1166.

4 <i>Find A Grave</i>, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=6977865.

5 <i>1830 United States Census</i>, 1830; Census Place: Tippecanoe, Indiana; Series: M19; Roll: 31; Page: 107; Family History Library Film: 0007720.

6 <i>Biographical record and portrait album of Tippecanoe County, Indiana</i> (Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1888. 826 pages.), online https://books.google.com/books?id=2dgWAQAAMAAJ&lpg=PA678&ots=1mHnTDP8Iv&dq=christian%20beeker%20tippecanoe&pg=PA340#v=onepage&q=beeker&f=false Page 340-342. Tippecanoe Township.

7 Richard Patten DeHart, <i>Past and Present of Tippecanoe County, Indiana: Vol 1</i> (Indianapolis, Indiana, B. F. Bowen & Coompany, Publishers. 1909. Online https://play.google.com/books/reader?id=ay4VAAAAYAAJ at Google Books), Vol I, Page 176.

8 <i>The Indianapolis Star</i> (Indianapolis, Marion, Indiana.), 21 Aug 1966, page 108. Indiana Ancestors column.

9 <i>Find A Grave</i>, http://findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=6977859.

10 Ancestry.com, <i>A Roster of Revolutionary Ancestors of the Indiana Daughters of the American Revolution</i>, Page 677. Jacob Young.



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